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New quiz on CNBC.com: Are you an insurance pro?

Are you financially prepared for a fire, a break-in, or an accident? How much do you REALLY know about insurance? We’re proud to have collaborated with CNBC on this quiz, all about insurance!

This quiz is a part of CNBC and Acorns’ financial literacy initiative Invest In You: Ready. Set. Grow.

Find the Spanish version, courtesy of Telemundo, here.

POSTED: October 1, 2019 | BY: admin

#econready contest results are in!

Our #econready contest has concluded! We asked K-12 teachers to show us how they will be incorporating economics and personal finance into their classrooms this year and to let us know which EconEdLink resource (lesson plan, video, or activity) complimented their work. We were thoroughly impressed by all the contest entrants!

The winners:
1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

Each of these entrants will be receiving a $200 credit at the CEE store.

Honorable mention:

We’d also like to thank Kevin Morgan, who has been on a roll sharing his economics and personal finance teaching on social media:

Thanks to everyone who participated or spread the word, as well as all the K-12 teachers across the country that are equipping their students with the tools and knowledge of economics and personal finance!

POSTED: October 1, 2019 | BY: admin

Show us your #EconReady classroom for a chance to win $200!

As the school year begins, the Council for Economic Education (CEE) wants to recognize those K-12 teachers of all subjects who are gearing up to equip their students with the tools and knowledge of personal finance and economics. Introducing students to the vocabulary of money helps them make better decisions for themselves, their families, and their communities. Whether you teach econ, government, English, math, social studies, or physical education, CEE wants to know how you’ve made your classroom #EconReady.

From August 27 until September 27th, we’ll be on social media sharing how teachers have prepped their classrooms to incorporate economics and personal finance. The creators of the five posts who get the most likes/shares will receive a $200 credit for our online store (limit one prize per entrant)!

How to participate:

  1. Take a picture or video of your #EconReady classroom (Note: Please adhere to your school’s photo/video media release policies with regards to including photos of students).
  2. Post it on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, or LinkedIn with the hashtag #EconReady, and tag @CouncilEconEd.
  3. Comment on your own post with a link to one of the resources from EconEdLink.org (a free lesson plan, a video, interactive, etc.).

For step 3 you can choose your own preferred EconEdLink resource or find one you like from this list:

Guidance/Counseling: How Will I Pay for College? (grades 9-12)
Math: Using Slope to Compute Opportunity Cost (grades 9-12)
Physical Education: The Economics of Professional Sports: If You Build It, Will They Come? (grades 9-12)
Economics: Sandwich Supply and Dessert Demand (grades 6-8)
English learning arts (ELA): “The Giver”: Jonas Makes a Choice (grades 6-8)
Global studies: The Civil War: A War of Resources (grades 6-8)
Science: Blowing in the Wind (grades 6-8)
Elementary: Competition Pizza (grades 3-5)
Elementary: Learning Economics with Minecraft: Choices, Costs and Benefits (grades 3-5)
Elementary: Bad Kitty Gets “Good” Goods and Services (grades K-2)
Elementary: Every Penny Counts (grades K-2)
Career and technical education: Understanding a Balance Sheet

Example post:

We look forward to seeing (and sharing) your #EconReady classrooms!

*CEE reserves the right in its sole discretion to exclude any entries for consideration.

POSTED: August 27, 2019 | BY: admin

Our statement on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP)

The Council for Economic Education strongly disagrees with the National Assessment Governing Board‘s decision to eliminate the assessment of economics from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). Economics has been assessed twice since 2006 and, while the gap between assessments has been greater than we would like, the findings have been important in helping to understand the state of economic education in the United States.

We encourage our community to voice its opposition to this decision, along with our statement below, to the following officials:
• Munira Mwalimu, Executive Officer for the National Assessment Governing Board: Munira.Mwalimu@ed.gov
• Your representative and senators: https://www.govtrack.us/

The Council for Economic Education (CEE), the nation’s leading non-profit supporting the teaching of K-12 economics, strongly objects to the recent decision by the National Assessment Governing Board (NAGB) to remove the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) in economics from its assessment schedule. This is a short-sighted decision that impairs our understanding in a critical subject area.

Our system of education in America invests billions of dollars each year helping our children master reading, writing and mathematics, which is essential. Yet we send them out into the world lacking the basic skills to prosper in life: an understanding of how to successfully navigate an increasingly complex economy, one where large-scale economic policy issues such as trade and labor-market shifts have profound small-scale implications for individual Americans. This lack of knowledge has potentially devastating ramifications. Americans currently carry more than $1.4 trillion in student debt; more than one-third of the population can be classified as financially fragile; and nearly 60% of Americans are living paycheck-to-paycheck.

Against this backdrop, the decision to cancel the NAEP in economics in 2022 is a clear signal that NAGB – and by extension the Department of Education, from where NAGB’s budget is derived – does not seem to think that these issues are priorities. Canceling the NAEP in economics is the equivalent of saying that the study of economics is not a worthwhile endeavor for our young people. Given the financial insecurity of many Americans, that is deeply troubling.

Gov. Beverly Purdue, chair of the Governing Board, noted in NAGB’s statement on the NAEP schedule, “We are ensuring that our students are assessed on the knowledge and skills they need to become successful citizens.” CEE could not disagree more. Without the knowledge and vocabulary of economics, students lack essential tools to create financial stability and opportunity for themselves and their families. And when families struggle, that has consequences for the communities where they live and for society as a whole. NAGB’s decision ensures that students are not assessed on the knowledge and skills they need to become participatory citizens.

NAGB’s announcement claimed that its decision was made in part to “create more actionable information.” In fact, the elimination of economics does the opposite, eliminating data collection from a core component – along with history, civics, and geography – of a complete social studies education. Incomplete information on social studies will not result in more actionable information, it will instead make less clear how to best proceed in ensuring students have the social studies education they deserve.

In light of this move by NAGB, CEE
• Urges NAGB to reconsider their decision, and to return the NAEP in economics to the 2022 schedule, as previously planned
• Encourages NAGB to put the NAEP in economics on a more regular and consistent schedule
• Urges Congress to increase funding for the Institute for Education Sciences (IES) so that appropriate resources can be put toward an assessment schedule that includes the full NAEP slate as originally planned, including testing economics in 2022

Absent these actions, NAGB, the Department of Education, and Congress will be short-changing America’s youth and America’s future.

Respectfully,

Nan J. Morrison
President and CEO
Council for Economic Education

POSTED: August 9, 2019 | BY: admin

More Girls to learn critical life and career finance skills as the Council for Economic Education and Invest in Girls merge for greater impact

Girls, who too-often struggle with personal finance and are
wary of financial careers, will be getting a needed boost in their classrooms
nationwide, thanks to a merger of two nonprofit financial education
organizations: the Council for Economic Education (CEE) and Invest in Girls
(IIG). The SeaChange-Lodestar Fund for Nonprofit Collaboration supported this
effort.

By working together, the two organizations will expand their
efforts with students and schools, community groups, corporations and
foundations to provide and advocate for financial literacy programming.

“America’s schools spend billions of dollars helping
children master reading and math, and then far too often send them out into the
world lacking a basic skill to prosper in life: understanding personal
finance,” said Nan J. Morrison, CEE president and CEO. “By merging our two
strong programs, we will be able to have a broader impact on the futures of
America’s young women.”

When
it comes to personal finance, classroom teaching is often a missing ingredient;
only one-third of the states require a personal finance class for graduation,
according to CEE’s biennial Survey of the States, which monitors our
country’s progress in this area.

“Girls especially need a safe environment for asking
questions and taking chances in order to learn,” said Betsy Kelder, executive director
of Invest in Girls. “With the merger, our programs will now touch the lives of
even more girls and women, teaching them skills for good financial decision
making and accelerating change in the landscape of America’s financial industry.”

Strong female role models in corporate board rooms and
finance offices also are in short supply, Morrison and Kelder noted.

Together, CEE and IIG will continue and expand programs to
develop generations of financially literate girls and change the way that girls
interact with money. The merger allows CEE to provide additional tools to young
women through its network of affiliated partners across the country. This includes
IIG programs that bring women in finance to schools and girls on industry field
trips to bolster students’ personal finance knowledge and encourage career
paths. The programs are targeted to high school girls, opening to them a world
of budgeting and credit, investments and savings, taxes and insurance.

“The fact that IIG was just
for girls and taught by a woman made it a very comfortable learning environment
for me,” said Keyona Duncan, who participated in an IIG program at a
Boston-area high school. “The teachers and volunteers were role models to us.”

She went on to study
business management and accounting in college.

“Learning about personal
finance taught me to be more assertive. I no longer felt like I had to hold
back as a female,” Duncan said. “My mom told me she learned about finances on
her own—as an adult, the hard way.”

Knowledge of personal finance provides the tools for children to
set goals and create lives around the horizon line of their choice. For
70 years, CEE has helped teachers bring personal finance to classrooms through
free teacher professional development and classroom resources, online and
offline, for all students in grades K through 12. CEE also runs the National
Economics Challenge and National Personal Finance Challenge and is rolling out
Family Financial Literacy nights across the country.

IIG’s main office will remain in Boston and operate as a
program of New York City-based CEE. Staff from both organizations will continue
in their current roles.

For more information about CEE or IIG programs, please
contact info@councilforeconed.org.

#

About the Council for Economic Education:

The Council for Economic Education’s mission is to teach K-12 students
about economics and personal finance so that they can make better decisions for
themselves, their families and their communities. We carry out our mission by
providing resources and training to K-12 educators and have done so for 70
years. Nearly 2/3 of the teachers CEE reaches in person are in low- and
moderate-income schools.

About Invest in Girls:

Invest in Girls partners with corporations and finance industry volunteers to
provide classroom workshops and role models, to open doors to girls in the form
of industry trips, and to work tirelessly to support IIG’s mission: to ensure
that all girls have access to a financial education and to cultivate a
generation of financially literate girls. Information about IIG’s programs is
available online here.

POSTED: July 31, 2019 | BY: admin

Nan J. Morrison and Annamaria Lusardi publish op-ed in Education Week

The Council for Economic Education’s president and CEO, Nan J. Morrison, as well as board member Annamaria Lusardi, the Denit Trust Distinguished Scholar and Professor of Economics and Accountancy at The George Washington University School of Business, published an op-ed in Education Week making the case that providing financial education is effective and necessary.


Image by Getty via Education Week

A solid financial education has affected the lives of so many students who need this knowledge and may not have access to it at home. Financial education provides the tools and skills for our students to make informed decisions which benefit themselves, their families and their communities. It’s time and money well spent.

Read the whole piece here.

POSTED: July 29, 2019 | BY: admin

Summer 2019 CEE Report

No matter what the industry, it all comes down to knowledge sharing, creativity and economic empowerment. This blog focuses on that intersection.

POSTED: July 17, 2019 | BY: admin

Recap: 2019 National Economics Challenge

The top 134 students out of a total of 10,000 contestants from high schools across the USA and China descended upon New York City to compete in the final rounds of Council for Economic Education’s 19th Annual National Economics Challenge (NEC). Through written exams, a Critical Thinking Round based on persuasive presentations, and head-to-head Quiz Bowls, they battled for the top prizes in two divisions: the David Ricardo Division, for first-time competitors who have taken one economics course, and the Adam Smith Division for AP, international baccalaureate, and honors students (as well as any returning competitors).

Andrew Ross Sorkin, co-anchor of CNBC’s Squawk Box and editor/contributor for The New York Times, hosted the Quiz Bowl Finals. Mary C. Daly, President of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, provided pre-recorded video questions.

For the first time in the history of the NEC, the same high school won both USA divisions. The top two teams in each division from both the USA and China then faced off for the National Championship, before the winners from each country competed in the international round. Winners are as follows:

USA Adam Smith Division: Mt. Hebron High School (MD)
USA David Ricardo Division: Mt. Hebron High School (MD)
CHINA Adam Smith Division: BASIS International School Guangzhou (Guangdong)
CHINA David Ricardo Division: Shanghai Starriver Bilingual School (Shanghai)
International Adam Smith: BASIS International School Guangzhou (Guangdong)
International David Ricardo: Shanghai Starriver Bilingual School (Shanghai)
In between rounds, teams enjoyed a visit to the One World Observatory at the top of the One World Trade Center, as well as guest speaker sessions with CEE Board Chair and Managing Partner of Sage Asset Manager Barry Haimes, and Atlas Merchant Bank Operating Partner and CEE Board Member Larry Kantor, as well as CEE Associate Board members Rachel Lipsky, Consultant at Deloitte Tax, and Rahim Muhammad, Financial Consultant at Charles Schwab.

CNBC covered the event extensively, with student contestants interviewed on Squawk Box, live check-ins during The Exchange and Power Lunch, and a story on the Nightly Business Report. CNBC also streamed the Quiz Bowl Finals live on their website.

A big thank you goes out to every student, teacher, CEE network member, and staff member as well as to CNBC, and Andnow Media who helped to make the 2019 National Economics Challenge a success. Thanks as well to our exclusive partner in China, SKT Education & Beyond, and our sponsors: the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, Bloomberg Philanthropies, Schwarzman Scholars, and Russell Glass.

Please enjoy the following photos and videos from the event.

POSTED: July 3, 2019 | BY: admin

Recap: 2019 National Personal Finance Challenge

On Friday, May 10, 84 high school students out of a total of 18,000 participants nation-wide, each representing their home state, met at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln to compete in the final rounds of the Council for Economic Education’s 2019 National Personal Finance Challenge.

Each team had two hours to devise a financial plan for a hypothetical family featuring a daughter headed off to college, a business-owning father with dreams of early retirement, growing debts, and other parameters. After preliminary presentations, the top three teams gave final presentations to judges Nebraska State Treasurer John Murante, Omaha Federal Reserve Branch Executive Nate Kauffman, UNL College of Business Dean Kathy Farrell, Voya Finacial’s Vice-President of Diversity and Inclusion Nicole Starks, and veteran financial advisor and former Superbowl-winning football player Tony Veland.

The top three teams placed as follows:
First place: SAR High School (NY)
Second place: BASIS Scottsdale (AZ)
Third place: Madeira High School (OH)

Televised news reports about the National Personal Finance Challenge ran in Omaha and New York City, with print coverage in Alabama, Rhode Island, North Carolina, and Missouri, among others.

The Council for Economic Education would like to thank every student, teacher, CEE network members, and staff that worked to make the National Personal Finance Challenge a success. Special thanks are due to the event sponsor, Voya Financial, and to the Nebraska Council on Economic Education for hosting and organizing the event.

Please enjoy the following videos and photos.

Photos by Garrett Stolz, University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

POSTED: July 2, 2019 | BY: admin

Protected: Lorem ipsem

No matter what the industry, it all comes down to knowledge sharing, creativity and economic empowerment. This blog focuses on that intersection.

POSTED: May 21, 2019 | BY: admin